Agenda item

APPLICATION NO. DM2018/01865 - 79-85 Beddington Lane, Beddington, CR0 4TH

Proposed construction and operation of the Beddington Lane Resource Recovery Facility, comprising a main waste processing building, two storey administration and amenity building, weighbridge's with associated gatehouses, car park (50 spaces, including 3 disabled and 11 electric charging points), enclosed RCV fleet parking structure (14 Spaces), water tanks and associated pump house, vehicle refuelling area, two new accesses off Beddington Lane, highway improvement works to Beddington Lane, surface and foul water drainage infrastructure, vehicle circulation and manoeuvring space, soft landscaping and other ancillary infrastructure (including fencing, gating, mobile plant service bay, cycle store, smoking shelter and electrical sub-stations).

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report on the above application for a proposed construction and operation of the Beddington Lane Resource Recovery Facility, comprising a main waste processing building, two storey administration and amenity building, weighbridges with associated gatehouses, car park (50 spaces, including 3 disabled and 11 electric charging points), enclosed RCV fleet parking structure (14 spaces), water tanks and associated pump house, vehicle refuelling area, two new accesses off Beddington Lane, highway improvement works to Beddington Lane, surface and foul water drainage infrastructure, vehicle circulation and manoeuvring space, soft landscaping and other ancillary infrastructure (including fencing, gating, mobile plant service bay, cycle store, smoking shelter and electrical sub-stations).

 

The application was presented to Planning Committee at the discretion of the Head of Development Management and Strategic Planning.

 

Following the presentation by Iain Williams, Senior Planning Officer, Members clarified:

 

Mile Road is currently owned by Thames Water and would not become a general access road.

 

The site in the application was an approved site in the South London Waste Plan, and is an allocated site for this type of operation, which was also covered by the London Plan. Members suggested the figures for traffic movement may be higher than were reported. 

 

The applicant had proposed the routing of HGV traffic to and from the site would be via Coomber Way and Ampere Way to the A23, although a letter included within the report suggested that Croydon Council would not support this routing. The Senior Planning Officer explained that a condition (condition 9) of the application would require the development of a transport plan, including details of HGV routing, in agreement with all stakeholders if the application were to be approved.

 

The air quality assessment included in this application was Sutton’s Policy,  it remained a  requirement for Local Authorities to apply their own policies. London’s air quality is a strategic issue therefore policies across the boroughs in London are closely aligned.

 

In discussion regarding odour, the Senior Planning Officer provided explanation of the proposed operation of the processes within the site. Permits from the Environment Agency would be a requirement prior to the site becoming operational.

 

A detailed environmental statement was provided which included neighbouring properties, and the mitigations put in place.

 

Councillor Andrew Pelling, London Borough of Croydon, an objector, addressed the meeting under Standing Order 31.

 

The principal issues raised by the objector were that:-

 

London Borough of Croydon intends further development in the area along the A23 Purley Way in the future.

Local Authorities should work together.

There is a need for a commitment from the applicant about traffic and how traffic is managed to minimise blockages on routes.

Councillor Andrew Pelling suggested that Croydon Council may consider blocking Coomber Way in the future.

 

Members clarified if:

 

The objector if he felt agreement between London Borough of Croydon and London Borough of Sutton could be achieved, Councillor Pelling confirmed his comments were as a Councillor on behalf of the London Borough of Croydon.

 

It was reported that s106 monies had been taken to allow waste to be transported to Beddington Lane via the A23 in the past.

 

Officers, Members and the Objector agreed that both boroughs should work together, and discussions should include strategic considerations, the A23 is part of TfL’s transport network.

 

TfL had not raised an objection.

 

Members drew attention that all routes from the site lead to the A23, although each would access it at different points, also that the proposed operation would generate a significant volume of traffic.

 

The analysis of current data regarding traffic movements in the Beddington Lane area had been delayed and remained unavailable and could not be provided until  after repair works to Ampere Way have been completed.

 

There were outstanding planning permissions in the area which could add to traffic volumes.

 

The applicant Emma Smythe, SUEZ Recycling and Recovery UK and Andrew Bell, Focus Transport Planning addressed the Committee:

 

The principal issues raised by the applicant/agent were that:-

 

The application being considered would generate less additional traffic than the current planning permission in place.

The application would improve the appearance of the site.

Environment Agency permits were separate from the Planning considerations.

The applicant acknowledged and accepted the amended condition (condition 9) relating to a transport plan and agreed to work with all stakeholders including the London Borough of Croydon

 

Councillor Nick Mattey, ward Councillor addressed the meeting

 

The principal issues raised by the ward Councillor  were that:-

 

There were concerns about the safety record of the applicant, in relation to recent fires at several of their sites.

The figures quoted may underestimate the number of journeys as each vehicle either arriving at or leaving the site may not be fully loaded, resulting in more vehicles being required  to transport the estimated volume of materials.

Current traffic levels in the area are at breaking point.

The additional traffic would create structural damage to buildings in the area.

Nitrous Oxide levels in Beddington Lane are above World Health Organisation recommended levels.

 

In debate Members confirmed:

 

The enforcement process for traffic movement would be a part of the transport plan.

Members suggested a time factor should be added to condition 9.

 

A poll vote on the officers’ recommendation to grant permission was held in accordance with Standing Order 31.4, when there voted:

 

RESOLVED:

 

That planning permission be granted for application No. DM2018/01865 - 79-85 BEDDINGTON LANE, BEDDINGTON, CR0 4TH, subject to (a) the written conclusion of a ‘section 106’ agreement by 31 December 2019 from the date of this decision, or such longer period as may be agreed in writing by the Head of Development Management and Strategic Planning after which time the decision to grant planning permission will be rescinded; and (b) the conditions, reasons and informatives set out in the planning portal.

 

Supporting documents: